Home » Military Sucess from God, a Sermon: Preached in the Eliot Church, Roxbury, Fast Day, April 3, 1862 by A.C. Thompson
Military Sucess from God, a Sermon: Preached in the Eliot Church, Roxbury, Fast Day, April 3, 1862 A.C. Thompson

Military Sucess from God, a Sermon: Preached in the Eliot Church, Roxbury, Fast Day, April 3, 1862

A.C. Thompson

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331873433
Paperback
30 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from Military Sucess From God, a Sermon: Preached in the Eliot Church, Roxbury, Fast Day, April 3, 1862Nearly one thousand years before our Saviour, the third king of Judah, whose name is here mentioned, came to the throne. He was an honest,MoreExcerpt from Military Sucess From God, a Sermon: Preached in the Eliot Church, Roxbury, Fast Day, April 3, 1862Nearly one thousand years before our Saviour, the third king of Judah, whose name is here mentioned, came to the throne. He was an honest, resolute, sagacious man- after the type and with the spirit of David. He did that which was right in the sight of God.Great disorders prevailed at his accession. He devoted himself to correcting these, rooting out idolatry and its attendant evils, replenishing an exhausted treasury, consolidating the government, securing internal unity and strength, and bringing the army into a more satisfactory condition than it had ever been before. The efficiency of his forces and of his faith was put to a severe test.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.